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OSHA's Confined Spaces Rule Impacts Home Performance Workers

OSHA Postpones Confined Spaces Rule Enforcement
Enforcement delayed until January 8, 2016

Malta, NY, October 15, 2015 - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently announced its decision to delay enforcement of the Confined Spaces in Construction Standard until January 8, 2016. 

Although the ruling went into effect on August 3, 2015, OSHA has agreed to refrain from issuing citations to any employer that is making good-faith efforts to comply with the standard.

Under the new rule (29 CFR 1926 Subpart AA), permits to access specific confined spaces are granted by the general contractor or lead contractor on each job. There are numerous safe entry procedures requiring planning and preparation by the contractor ahead of time.

The rule will apply to any space that meets the following three criteria:

  • Is large enough for a worker to enter it
  • Has limited means of entry or exit
  • Is not designed for continuous occupancy

A space may be a permit-required confined space if it has a hazardous atmosphere, the potential for suffocation, a layout that might trap a worker through converging walls or a sloped floor or any other serious safety or health hazard.

Employers will be required to train workers to ensure they know about the existence, location, and dangers posed by each permit-required confined space. 

View BPI's recorded webinar on what you need to know about OSHA's new confined spaces rule.

 

OSHA's Confined Spaces Rule Impacts Home Performance Workers 

New Rule Applies to Crawl Spaces and Attics

Malta, NY, June 30, 2015 - The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed a new rule to protect workers in confined spaces, including residential attics and crawl spaces, that will impact the work of home performance and weatherization professionals. 

Routine tasks such as installing spray-foam insulation in attics or installing plumbing in a crawlspace will require documented safety plans, and in some cases stationing an additional person outside the space to grant access.

Effective August 3rd, 2015, the rule -which has long applied to confined spaces such as tunnels and man holes- now specifies crawl spaces and attics due to recent fatalities. Two workers died while applying primer to floor joists in a crawl space. They were burned when an incandescent work lamp ignited vapors from the primer. In another incident, a flash fire killed a worker who was spraying foam insulation in an enclosed attic. The fire was caused by poor ventilation. OSHA estimates the rule will prevent nearly 800 serious injuries per year.

Under the new rule (29 CFR 1926 Subpart AA), permits to access specific confined spaces are granted by the general contractor or lead contractor on each job. There are numerous safe entry procedures requiring planning and preparation by the contractor ahead of time.

The rule will apply to any space that meets the following three criteria:

  • Is large enough for a worker to enter it
  • Has limited means of entry or exit
  • Is not designed for continuous occupancy

A space may be a permit-required confined space if it has a hazardous atmosphere, the potential for suffocation, a layout that might trap a worker through converging walls or a sloped floor, or any other serious safety or health hazard.

Under the new rule, permits to access specific confined spaces are granted by the general contractor or lead contractor on each job. There are numerous safe entry procedures requiring planning and preparation by the contractor ahead of time.

Employers will be required to train workers to ensure they know about the existence, location, and dangers posed by each permit-required confined space. 

BPI is organizing a webinar to discuss what the new rules mean for contractors in home performance and weatherization. A date will be announced soon.

For more information see the following links:  
OSHA - https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3787.pdf  

2015 Remodeling Leadership Conference Video - http://www.remodeling.hw.net/videos/playlist/remodeling-leadership-conference?vid=0000014d-9ac8-d58a-a7cf-9feea81c0000

ForResidentialPros.com -  http://www.forresidentialpros.com/news/11996112/crawl-spaces-and-attics-on-list-of-confined-spaces  

About the Building Performance Institute 

BPI is the nation's premier building performance credentialing, quality assurance and standards setting organization. BPI develops technical standards using an open, transparent, consensus-based process built on sound building science. From these standards, we develop professional certifications for individuals, companywide credentials for BPI GoldStar Contractors, home energy rating systems and quality assurance services that help raise the bar in home performance contracting. BPI is approved by the American National Standards Institute, Inc. (ANSI) as an accredited developer of American National Standards and as a certifying body for personnel credentials.

 

For more information on BPI, visit www.bpi.org/pros.


Building Performance Institute, Inc.

107 Hermes Road, Suite 210

Malta, NY 12020

Phone: (877) 274-1274

Fax: (866) 777-1274

info@bpi.org 

www.bpi.org 

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